Tubbs Fire

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Tubbs Fire
Map of the burn area of the Tubbs Fire (top) and 2 other nearby fires
LocationSonoma County, California, Napa County, California, U.S.
Coordinates38.60895°N 122.62879°WCoordinates: 38.60895°N 122.62879°W
Statistics[1]
Cost~$1.3 billion (2017 USD)[2][3]
Date(s)October 8, 2017 – October 31, 2017
Burned area36,807 acres (149 km2)[4]
CauseFailure of private electrical system [5]
Buildings
destroyed
5,643 structures[4][6]
Fatalities22[4]
Non-fatal injuries1
[Full screen]
Location of Tubbs Fire

The Tubbs Fire was a very destructive wildfire occurring in Northern California during the month of October in 2017. It was, at the time, the most destructive wildfire in California history,[7][4] burning parts of Napa, Sonoma, and Lake counties, inflicting its greatest losses on the Sonoma County city of Santa Rosa. It is currently viewed as the second-most destructive California wildfire, after the Camp Fire of 2018.[8] The Tubbs Fire was one of more than a dozen large fires which broke out in early October, 2017 and were simultaneously burning in eight Northern California counties, in what was called the “Northern California firestorm.”[9] By the time of its containment on October 31, the fire was estimated to have burned 36,810 acres (149 km2);[10][11] at least 22 people were believed to have been killed in Sonoma County by the fire.[12]

The fire started near Tubbs Lane in the rural northern part of Calistoga, in Napa County. It incinerated more than 5,643 structures,[4][6][13] half of which were homes in the city of Santa Rosa.[14] Santa Rosa’s damage from the Tubbs Fire was estimated at $1.2 billion (2017 USD), with five percent of the city’s housing stock destroyed.[2] The Tubbs Fire also incurred an additional $100 million in fire suppression costs.[3]

After an investigation lasting over a year, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE) determined that the Tubbs Fire was “caused by a private electrical system adjacent to a residential structure” and that there had been no violations of the state’s Public Resources Code.[15]